Knowledge obsolesence

And a free skills upgrade for Queenslanders

Links in chain of learning.
Links in the chain of learning.

There was a time when the knowledge you gained at the beginning of your career would more or less serve for your entire working life. These days things move so fast that some or all of what you know can become obsolete overnight.

This was rammed home forcefully late last year when my position was made redundant and I decided to use some of the spare time I gained to polish my skills. My main focus has always been content creation but I have had a sideline in developing, maintaining and hosting websites since the early 1990s. I therefore decided I would take a course or two on the subject and was amazed at how much had changed while I wasn’t looking.

My involvement with the Worldwide Web began in 1991 or 1992 when I happened to visit a university computer lab to do a story for the newspaper I was working for. This was around the time the web was launched and I was shown the very new marvel which I have to admit looked pretty unexciting at first glance. However I did start building web pages using tools like Windows Notepad, Microsoft Front Page and Macromedia Drumbeat (which has since morphed into Adobe Dreamweaver).

Then the WordPress blogging platform came along and eventually developed into a great tool for creating general websites that I used it almost exclusively for years. Having time on my hands, however, I decided to refresh my knowledge of creating sites from scratch and take a course on the most up-to-date version of Dreamweaver which I get with my Adobe Creative Cloud membership.

I looked around at the available online training resources and Lynda.com (coincidentally owned by LinkedIn) seemed to be the answer for my needs because it not only had courses on web page creation but also on many topics of interest to me including social media, photography, design and lots more. It also allows you to easily add course completion certificates to your LinkedIn profile which is handy.

The cost of a subscription to Lynda.com is not prohibitive but there is good news for Queenslanders because members of the State Library of Queensland get free access to all the Lynda.com courses. To my mind it’s an incredible bargain seeing that membership of the library is free too. Yay!!!!

Here’s a page with links to the library’s membership page and the Lynda.com sign-up page. It would be worth checking if your local libraries have a similar arrangement if you’re unlucky enough not to live in Queensland. I’ve now done quite a few Lynda.com courses and I highly recommend them.

Now go forth and make sure all the links in your set of skills are up to date and add new ones because you always want your chain of knowledge to be in good shape. It took me a while to make a connection, however tenuous, with the picture above, but I got there in the end. 😉

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